Quick Answer: Is Squashing Commits A Good Idea?

Can you squash a merge commit?

Squashing retains the changes but discards all the individual commits of the bugfix branch.

Note that git merge –squash prepares the merge but does not actually make a commit.

You will need to execute git commit to create the merge commit..

When should you avoid rebasing a branch?

1 Answer. Case 1: We should not do Rebase on branch that is public, i.e. if you are not alone working on that branch and branch exists locally as well as remotely rebasing is not a good choice on such branches and it can cause bubble commits.

When to Use merge and rebase in git?

In summary, when looking to incorporate changes from one Git branch into another:Use merge in cases where you want a set of commits to be clearly grouped together in history.Use rebase when you want to keep a linear commit history.DON’T use rebase on a public/shared branch.

What does squashing a commit mean?

Squashing a commit means, from an idiomatic point of view, to move the changes introduced in said commit into its parent so that you end up with one commit instead of two (or more). If you repeat this process multiple times, you can reduce n commit to a single one.

Why is rebase bad?

Rebasing can be dangerous! Rewriting history of shared branches is prone to team work breakage. This can be mitigated by doing the rebase/squash on a copy of the feature branch, but rebase carries the implication that competence and carefulness must be employed.

Should I squash and merge?

As a general rule, when merging a pull request from a feature branch with a messy commit history, you should squash your commits. There are exceptions, but in most cases, squashing results in a cleaner Git history that’s easier for the team to read.

Who should merge a pull request?

The reviewer, who is already looking at the code, could just merge it immediately. In the case of changes being requested at step 3, the agency to merge the pull request now rests solely with the PR’s author. No one besides the author will look at the changes prior to merging.

How many commits in a pull request?

One CommitOne Commit per Pull Request.

How do you squash all commits in one?

To squash multiple commits into one in the branch you’re on, do the following:Run git log to determine how many commits to squash. … Run git rebase -i HEAD~4 (with 4 being the number of commits)OR.Run git rebase -i [SHA] (where [SHA] is the commit after the last one you want to squash.More items…•

How do you squash commits in PR?

The default command before each commit is “pick”, so you just need to s/pick/squash/ for all the commits you want to squash, and then all of them will be squash into their last previous commit. Make sure you are rebasing on a correct branch.

Why do pull requests?

A pull requests is a mechanism for a developer to notify team members that a feature or fix, developed on a separate branch, is ready. This lets everybody involved know that they can review the code, providing a forum discussing the implementation of the proposed feature.

What makes a good pull request?

Offering feedbackFamiliarize yourself with the context of the issue, and reasons why this Pull Request exists.If you disagree strongly, consider giving it a few minutes before responding; think before you react.Ask, don’t tell. … Explain your reasons why code should be changed. … Offer ways to simplify or improve code.More items…•

Why merge commits are bad?

7 Answers. People want to avoid merge commits because it makes the log prettier. Seriously. It looks like the centralized logs they grew up with, and locally they can do all their development in a single branch.

Should I rebase or merge?

For individuals, rebasing makes a lot of sense. If you want to see the history completely same as it happened, you should use merge. Merge preserves history whereas rebase rewrites it . Rebasing is better to streamline a complex history, you are able to change the commit history by interactive rebase.

What is Git merge commit?

Git merging combines sequences of commits into one unified history of commits. There are two main ways Git will merge: Fast Forward and Three way. Git can automatically merge commits unless there are changes that conflict in both commit sequences.